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A recent study in the media identified a link between egg intake and risk of diabetes.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/11/201115101249.htm

The link was found in a sample of Chinese.  “What we discovered was that higher long-term egg consumption (greater than 38 grams per day) increased the risk of diabetes among Chinese adults by approximately 25 per cent.” 

This equates to about ½ an egg a day or 3-4 eggs per week.  This is not what I would call a high egg consumer.  We need to bear in mind two things considering this study. 

  1. It is only a correlation not a causation.
  2. The Chinese dietary patterns during the study (1999-2009) underwent a massive shift form traditional to western style diets.  The increase in egg consumption is only one part of a total diet shift.

Despite this study and the continuing debate around eggs…

  1. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25832339/
  2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2628696/

Guidelines suggest regular intake of eggs (1-2 daily) as part of a healthy diet to prevent and manage type 2 Diabetes.

https://www.diabetes.co.uk/news/2017/oct/new-study-unscrambles-myths-about-eggs,-heart-health-and-type-2-diabetes-92676807.html
https://www.healthline.com/health/diabetes/eggs#takeaway

Take home message remains the same.  Focus your diet on nutritionally dense foods.  Eggs are one of the most nutritiously dense foods in our food supply.

Chicken eggs and egg yolk,top view.